A comparison of reality versus fantasy on birches by robert frost

The philosophy articulated in "Birches" poses no threat to popular values or beliefs, and it is so appealingly affirmative that many readers have treasured the poem as a masterpiece.

While a number of scholars have examined Frost's theory of metaphor, even those who have turned their attention to "Birches" do not go into the detail that a close reading requires.

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The narrator has become weary from his responsibilities as an adult in this world where one has to maintain a rational outlook. On some level, he is claiming that this act of the imagination embodies a larger "truth" and is a worthy task, one that must be made with great care and diligence.

The cobwebs are the trials and tribulations that are feared because of their casting of unknown consequence, regardless of choice; they generate great anxiety or doubt in us.

Thus Frost "likes to think" that it is boys who bow down birch trees.

It is both the ultimate limit and the ultimate expression of his individuality—he stands alone in a world of his own making. Frost dismisses the ice storm as a cause of the birches' condition in favor of his original explanation that a boy had bent them—despite the fact that he knows that a boy didn't do it: But, in the last third of the poem, where he explicitly reads in the act of swinging birches a lesson for the governance of one's imaginative life, Frost draws back from the Prometheanism implied earlier in the poem: So, the rider is stopping to smell the roses.

The borders of the world define a person and place him or her in the real world, just as the birch trees are bent back toward the earth by the ice storm.

Robert Frost – 3 Poem Comparison Essay Sample

Despite his pervasive skepticism, and despite the experience evoked in the lines about the pathless wood, Frost does make his affirmation. Perhaps young boys don't bend birches down to stay, but swing them they do and thus bend them momentarily. Watkins explains that Frost "contemplates a moment when the soul may be completely absorbed into a union with the divine.

These seasons are ones that we sometimes use to represent the latter stages in life.

On some level, he is claiming that this act of the imagination embodies a larger "truth" and is a worthy task, one that must be made with great care and diligence. He moves forward, and momentary clarifications of an attitude or point of view rise to the surface, shimmer, and are submerged in the ongoing flow.

And this eighteenth-century skepticism, this resistance to metaphor and analogy, takes on an ultimate importance in Frost, for all philosophical theology, all affirmation of connection between time and eternity, man and God, depends on some form of analogy: The Poetic Metaphors 11 imagination, by contrast, which would rather have a boy bend those trees, is described in non-metaphorical, realistic imagery.

Frost's confession that the poem was "two fragments soldered together" is revealing; the overt, affected capriciousness of the transitions between major sections of the poem ll.

He wants to believe that it was a boy, who bent them, but logic does not allow it and he realizes it. And what we love about the poem, no matter how long we have read or studied Frost, is what first drew us to it and draws us back again:Sep 20,  · The great poet Robert Frost was asked if the poem, The Road Not Taken, was about an experience in the poet 's life: He answered that a poem is never about an experience, it is an experience.

Robert Frost – 3 Poem Comparison Essay Sample “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening”, “Birches”, and “The Road Not Taken” Robert Frost was an American poet that first became known after publishing a book in England.

Reality and Fantasy in the Poem "Birches" by Robert Frost PAGES 2.

WORDS 1, View Full Essay. More essays like this: robert frost, birches, reality versus fantasy. Not sure what I'd do without @Kibin - Alfredo Alvarez, student @ Miami University.

robert frost, birches, reality versus fantasy. Not sure what I'd do without @Kibin. The poem Birches, by Robert Frost reflects transcendentalism by wishing that nature’s corruptions be caused by a boy, rather than a snowstorm.

With a perfect blend of reality and imagination Frost writes a poem impacting readers for countless times again. Hardships in Birches by Robert Frost Essay - Hardships in Birches by Robert Frost In any life, one must endure hardship to enjoy the good times.

According to Robert Frost, the author of "Birches", enduring life's hardships can be made easier by finding a sane balance between one's imagination and reality. An Analysis of Birches - "Birches" is a memorable poem that is rich and interesting enough to repay more than one reading.

Robert Frost provides vivid images of birches in order to oppose life's harsh realities with the human actions of the imagination.

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A comparison of reality versus fantasy on birches by robert frost
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